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British Motoring Festival transports people to a simpler time of driving vehicles for pleasure


Published on July 16, 2017

Published on 16 July 2017

Don Aldous, of Newport, shows off his 1973 TR 6 — a vehicle he's had for more than 20 years.

Published on 16 July 2017

Representatives with the Atlantic Canada International Air Show brought the Supermarine Spitfire Mk IA with them to the British Motoring Festival July 15. The plane was similar to one that was piloted by Flying Officer John Stewart Hart in 1940. The air show will be held at 14 Wing Greenwood Aug. 26-27.

Published on 16 July 2017

This 1990 Rolls Royce Silver Spur was for sale at the British Motoring Festival and had quite the back story. The vehicle, which has bulletproof glass, was once used as an embassy car for the British ambassador to Turkey. It was chauffeur-driven for 12 years.

Published on 16 July 2017

Malcolm Mooney, of Ardoise, checked out this miniature vehicle while his family explored the grounds at King's-Edgehill School.

Published on 16 July 2017

Les Beazley, of Windsor, is the third owner of this 1979 Panther Lima. The vehicle was originally purchased in Weybridge, Surrey, England. Beazley has owned the vehicle for about eight years.

Published on 16 July 2017

This 1964 Jaguar E Type, owned by Bill Bigelow, of Hantsport, turned heads during the 2017 British Motoring Festival.

Published on 16 July 2017

There were a variety of distinctive emblems, including this one from a 1964 Jaguar E Type.

Published on 16 July 2017

There were a variety of distinctive emblems, hood ornaments and decorations to be admired at the 2017 British Motoring Festival.

Published on 16 July 2017

Car enthusiasts from across the Maritimes converged on King's-Edgehill School's campus to check out the vintage vehicles on display at the eighth annual British Motoring Festival. Pictured is a 1951 MG TD, owned by Larry Yockell, of Bridgewater.

Published on 16 July 2017

Hundreds of people visited KES July 15 to check out the British Motoring Festival. Pictured is a 1959 Singer Gazelle, owned by Rod Patriquin, of Dartmouth.

Published on 16 July 2017

This 1971 Mini 1000, owned by Ron Gray of Lower Sackville, drew a crowd at the eighth annual British Motoring Festival.

WINDSOR, N.S. — There's something about driving a vintage car that seems to make even the gloomiest day seem sunny.

For those attending the eighth annual British Motoring Festival in Windsor July 15, having the chance to show off their rides, talk with like-minded individuals and indulge in all things British, was a ticket to happiness.

“When I was a teenager, this is the car I always wanted to have and a neighbour friend of mine had one. I decided right then that someday I would buy one. Much later in life, I was in a position that I could,” said Don Aldous, of Newport, when asked how he came into possession of a shiny red 1973 TR 6 — a vehicle he's had for about 23 years.

“It's been a dream come true for me.”

Aldous is one of the committee members who volunteers his time to keep the popular festival going.

He said the car show, which is held at King's-Edgehill School every July, serves as a way to pay homage to a way of life that is quickly disappearing.

“All of these cars represents when motoring was fun and people went out for drives on Sunday and they enjoyed getting there,” said Aldous. “It wasn't just getting from Point A to B that mattered. It was how you got there and the fun of getting there. A lot of us are nostalgic for those days.”

Aldous has been participating in the festival since its inception.

From Jaguars and Aston Martins to Land Rovers and Triumphs, the festival had something for fans of vintage British automobiles to get excited over. Aside from the show and shine, visitors to the Saturday event could watch valve cover races, enjoy English cream teas and tap their toes to the sounds of Emerald Tide.

This year's festival highlighted two types of vehicles — models manufactured in 1967 and orphan marques, which are cars that are no longer manufactured and are not commonly encountered while travelling.

Drivers came from throughout the Maritimes and the eastern United States to participate. In 2016, there were 166 participating vehicles from New England, Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic Provinces.

Aldous said car enthusiasts should be sure to mark next year's festival on their calendars.

“I think they should come here to check out what motoring was all about in the past. That's what this is all about,” said Aldous.

For more information about the British Motoring Festival, or to stay apprised of when the 2018 event is taking place, visit: http://www.britishmotoringfestival.com.