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‘They have no way of knowing what making ice cream is all about’: Popular event at Tupperville museum introduces kids to making homemade ice cream

Janie Barkhouse and George Bruce of the Tupperville school museum are shown with the hand-cranked ice cream maker used to serve traditional ice cream at the museum’s annual fund raiser.
Janie Barkhouse and George Bruce of the Tupperville school museum are shown with the hand-cranked ice cream maker used to serve traditional ice cream at the museum’s annual fund raiser. - Paul Pickrem

TUPPERVILLE, NS - The lure of fresh hand-cranked homemade ice cream from a traditional recipe drew supporters of the Tupperville School Museum on a hot and humid Saturday afternoon recently.

The annual fundraiser for the museum housed in Tupperville's one-room school, which opened in 1869, was held on July 28. Ten flavours of homemade ice cream were cranked by hand in an ice cream maker from the collection of antique freezers and ice cream machines owned by board member George Bruce.

Bruce said the museum has offered traditional ice cream to visitors for decades. Staff and volunteers sometimes hold demonstrations of how ice cream was made in the past, which are especially popular with young visitors.

"They have no way of knowing what making ice cream is all about," he said. "They had a chance to crank on the machine and to eat as much as they wanted afterwards."

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"Most kids would never see a hand-crank done," said board member Janie Barkhouse, who attended the one-room school until Grade 6, following in the footsteps of her mother and aunt, who were also students at the school.

Ray McEnaney, of the Boston area, enjoyed a dish of home-made ice cream while listening to local music.
Ray McEnaney, of the Boston area, enjoyed a dish of home-made ice cream while listening to local music.

Ray McEnaney and his wife Terry were at the fundraiser again this year. The couple has visited the Valley every summer for more than 30 years from their home near Boston. They enjoyed the barbecue, traditional music, dancing and especially the homemade ice cream.

"The sights and sounds are just marvellous in this area, as well as the people," Ray said. "It's very encouraging to see an area that is so homey. Everyone reaches out to you. And, it's been that way all these years."

Janie Barkhouse is shown in the artifact exhibit of the one-room schoolhouse in Tupperville.
Janie Barkhouse is shown in the artifact exhibit of the one-room schoolhouse in Tupperville.

Bruce said the board will continue the tradition of hand cranking ice cream for visitors but would like to hear from members of the public who might pass on a traditional recipe for making large amounts of ice cream at a time.

Go online: Learn more about the Tupperville School Museum at https://tuppervilleschoolmuseum.ca/

If you go: The Tupperville School Museum is located at 2663 Highway 201, Tupperville. Upcoming events include rug hooking and braiding on Aug. 11 at 2 p.m.; teaching then and now on Aug. 18 at 2 p.m.; and Acadian Forests on Aug. 25 at 2 p.m.

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