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Wolfville’s Kent Lodge joins the ranks of Quiet Gardens

On the afternoon of the ecumenical blessing of the Quiet Garden, there was a throng of visitors enjoying the space in Wolfville.
On the afternoon of the ecumenical blessing of the Quiet Garden, there was a throng of visitors enjoying the space in Wolfville.

WOLFVILLE, NS – A Wolfville property has just become the first designated Quiet Garden in Nova Scotia.

Owner Pat Moore, centre, chats with visitors to her Quiet Garden off Main Street in Wolfville.

Owner Pat Moore had been focused on the project for about five years and she termed the new designation a kind of homage to her late husband, Reg Moore.
As Wolfville’s oldest house, Kent Lodge is a heritage property built partially on an Acadian foundation prior to 1755. In 1761, the present house was constructed by New England Planters. It was named for Queen Victoria’s father, the Duke of Kent, who was said to have visited the home.
The gardens surrounding the front of the property reflect this heritage with an Acadian kitchen garden in front and a more formal garden in the rear reflecting English influences.

The larger garden features Nova Scotia artists who made sculpture in stone, iron and wood.
“The flora reflects my late husband's respect for the land and his interest in landscape architecture,” Moore noted. “There are two sunken gardens, a small pond in an enclosed area, a diversity in small trees and a variety of garden seats and benches.”
Hand built rock walls surround the property reflect Reg Moore’s career teaching geology, she said.
Rev. Sandra Fyfe conducted an ecumenical service to bless the garden recently and earlier in the summer organized a prayer retreat there.
“It’s an amazing house and so quiet for being on Main Street,” Fyfe said.
Moore says an art day has been scheduled for this month.
“I’d like more music in the garden too,” she adds.
Melanie Priesnitz, conservation horticulturist at the
Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens in Wolfville, calls the designation “a wonderful opportunity for the community and visitors to take in the calm and beauty of this amazing garden.”
There are plenty of benches throughout the garden for sitting and a myriad of amazing pieces of artwork and plants to discover.
The open aspect provides a “wonderful opportunity for the community and visitors to take in the calm and beauty of this amazing garden in Wolfville,” Priestnitz suggested.
Andy Ostrander, who is a gardener at Grand Pre National Historic Site, said he was pleased to contribute his skills to a spruce-up of the garden.
Open to the public daily from sunrise to sunset seven days a week, the contemplative garden will be seasonal.

Did you know?
There are 300 quiet gardens worldwide. Quiet Gardens can be found around the world in a variety of settings including private homes, churches, schools and hospitals.
The movement began in Britain in 1992. Quiet Gardens were the vision of Philip Roderick, an Anglican priest working at the time in the Diocese of Oxford, England. The other gardens in Canada are located in Ontario and British Columbia.

Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Rowan Williams has said, “The ancient tradition of silent contemplation is as important to the modern mind as it was to those of our forebears – and the Quiet Garden Movement has been facilitating the practice of mindful contemplation for the past 25 years, in gardens across the world…”

http://quietgarden.org/find-gardens/north-america/canada/
 

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