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Prime minister visits Nova Scotia, tells local supporters in Truro Canada is 'heading in the right direction'


TC MEDIA - The crowd outside grew in number and angst – angry protestors with signs and effigies – as the folk band inside glanced at each other nervously near the end of each song.

“What next?”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper was somewhere else, somewhere outside the gymnasium at Cobequid Educational Centre in Truro while people hobnobbed and fiddled with their phones during the wait.

Finally, several minutes after the scheduled 7:20 p.m. start time May 14, Minister of Justice Peter MacKay stepped to the centre of the room and began a quasi-standup routine to introduce the evening.

“We’re in full meltdown mode now,” he said, presumably about the long winter and spring thaw. “But enough about Elizabeth May…”

After comments from local MP Scott Armstrong, the prime minister entered to room to a standing ovation.

“How is it to be back in your old high school?” he quipped to Armstrong. “You did graduate, right?”

After a few jokes and a back-and-forth with Armstrong, he launched into his speech for the evening, highlighting the achievements of his party in recent years.

“As I have said before, the measure of good government, the tests of leadership, lies not in achieving success in times of peace and stability, but doing so in times of risk and danger.”

His comments touched on the global economy, defence, taxes and local job growth, with the overall message of Canada being above the rest.

“Not withstanding all the uncertainty and instability in the world, this country is heading in the right direction.”

Outdoors, a gathering of 200 or more protestors had a different idea.

“We’re here to send a message to Stephen Harper that it’s time for him to go home and stay home,” said one protestor while holding a large puppet. She gave her name only as Colleen, with the Public Service Alliance of Canada, fearing it may have an effect on her job. “There have been threats made against us by this government. They’ve made threats about arrests and job ramifications.”

In the minutes before the scheduled start time, the crowd grew larger and started moving towards the front steps of CEC, where four police officers stood guard.

“Hey, hey, ho, ho, Stephen Harper’s got to go!” they chanted.

The crowd included independent protestors and members of several unions, including the PSAC, Union of Canadian Correctional Officers and Union of National Defence Employees.

Jennifer McNish was one of many protestors to travel from Halifax for the appearance.

“I’m here to stand united with the rest of Canada that wants to see Harper and his corporate agenda out of Canada,” she said, while also referencing his environmental record.

Inside, however, the tone was much different.

“We have dealt with each challenge that has come our way, and we have emerged successfully,” Harper said. “That success is the envy of countries from all around the world.”

According to Chris Guinan, executive assistant to Armstrong, “this would be the only party event per se” Harper is attending locally “but he is in town for the announcement (Friday) and a couple local stops.”  

Harper is scheduled to be at the Rath Eastlink Community Centre mid-morning to make an undisclosed announcement. He will be joined by MacKay, Rob Moore with Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Armstrong.

 

 

“What next?”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper was somewhere else, somewhere outside the gymnasium at Cobequid Educational Centre in Truro while people hobnobbed and fiddled with their phones during the wait.

Finally, several minutes after the scheduled 7:20 p.m. start time May 14, Minister of Justice Peter MacKay stepped to the centre of the room and began a quasi-standup routine to introduce the evening.

“We’re in full meltdown mode now,” he said, presumably about the long winter and spring thaw. “But enough about Elizabeth May…”

After comments from local MP Scott Armstrong, the prime minister entered to room to a standing ovation.

“How is it to be back in your old high school?” he quipped to Armstrong. “You did graduate, right?”

After a few jokes and a back-and-forth with Armstrong, he launched into his speech for the evening, highlighting the achievements of his party in recent years.

“As I have said before, the measure of good government, the tests of leadership, lies not in achieving success in times of peace and stability, but doing so in times of risk and danger.”

His comments touched on the global economy, defence, taxes and local job growth, with the overall message of Canada being above the rest.

“Not withstanding all the uncertainty and instability in the world, this country is heading in the right direction.”

Outdoors, a gathering of 200 or more protestors had a different idea.

“We’re here to send a message to Stephen Harper that it’s time for him to go home and stay home,” said one protestor while holding a large puppet. She gave her name only as Colleen, with the Public Service Alliance of Canada, fearing it may have an effect on her job. “There have been threats made against us by this government. They’ve made threats about arrests and job ramifications.”

In the minutes before the scheduled start time, the crowd grew larger and started moving towards the front steps of CEC, where four police officers stood guard.

“Hey, hey, ho, ho, Stephen Harper’s got to go!” they chanted.

The crowd included independent protestors and members of several unions, including the PSAC, Union of Canadian Correctional Officers and Union of National Defence Employees.

Jennifer McNish was one of many protestors to travel from Halifax for the appearance.

“I’m here to stand united with the rest of Canada that wants to see Harper and his corporate agenda out of Canada,” she said, while also referencing his environmental record.

Inside, however, the tone was much different.

“We have dealt with each challenge that has come our way, and we have emerged successfully,” Harper said. “That success is the envy of countries from all around the world.”

According to Chris Guinan, executive assistant to Armstrong, “this would be the only party event per se” Harper is attending locally “but he is in town for the announcement (Friday) and a couple local stops.”  

Harper is scheduled to be at the Rath Eastlink Community Centre mid-morning to make an undisclosed announcement. He will be joined by MacKay, Rob Moore with Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Armstrong.

 

 

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