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Windsor music school establishing instrument lending library in memory of beloved teacher

Jake Smith, co-owner of Moe’s Music School, said he’s happy to continue on Ted Woundy’s legacy through the Ted Woundy Musical Instrument Lending Library. A donation drive for gently used instruments is taking place on Feb. 1 and 3 at the school.
Jake Smith, co-owner of Moe’s Music School, said he’s happy to continue on Ted Woundy’s legacy through the Ted Woundy Musical Instrument Lending Library. A donation drive for gently used instruments is taking place on Feb. 1 and 3 at the school. - Colin Chisholm

WINDSOR, N.S. – Have an old guitar or keyboard that’s collecting dust? Moe’s Music School is hoping it could help inspire the next generation of musicians.

Jake Smith, co-owner of Moe’s Music School said they decided to establish the Ted Woundy Musical Instrument Lending Library to both help out those who are interested in trying out an instrument and to also carry on Woundy’s legacy.

It’s an idea that they’ve had for some time, but with Woundy’s passing in 2018, it made sense to name the project after him.

“We believe that everybody should be given the opportunity to play music and sometimes it’s not always easy for people to go out and buy an instrument,” Smith said.

“It’s something that Ted Woundy did with his students, he would lend out instruments and push kids to pick up different instruments they never thought they could play,” he said. “he inspired a whole generation of students and we wanted to help continue that legacy.”

“Ted was a great friend to us and to the store and the school,” he said. “It’s super important for us to recognize him.”

Smith said he discussed the idea with Woundy’s family, and they gave them their blessing to continue in his name.

The set-up is quite similar to, well, a library. Once launched users will come in, register, take out the instrument for approximately five weeks and then return it – with the option of renewing.

Smith said he’s hoping to have a wide array of instruments available from guitars, to drum kits, keyboards and more.

Some of the logistics are still getting worked out, but Smith said he’s hoping this could inspire more people to take up learning to play a musical instrument.

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A donation drive has been scheduled for Feb. 1 and Feb. 3 at Moe’s Music School, where people who have ‘gently used’ instruments that are gathering dust can be given towards the library’s inventory.

“They do have to be in decent enough shape so that a beginner could play it,” he said.

Once there are enough instruments in the library’s inventory a launch date will be announced.

“It’s still pretty emotional because I know a lot of students who wouldn’t be playing music today if it wasn’t for Ted pushing them to pick up an instrument,” he said. “It’s important for us to do this.”

Heather Donohue, a fellow co-owner of the music school, said she still cries on a daily basis when thinking about Woundy, adding that he would likely think this initiative “is so cool.”

“This project is incredibly personal for me,” Donohue said. “My son was fortunate enough to have Ted as a teacher and had such an impact on our lives that we eventually became friends.”

“Ted and I used to joke about the instruments he would send home for Evan to try, I would send him a message that read something like ‘a trumpet? are you kidding me?’ But, he knew we loved having the opportunity to try on new things, he knew we loved him, and I'm very proud to be able to honour him by helping to facilitate this program.”

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