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Senator Ogilvie to speak on Senate committee’s dementia report at Acadia University

Senator Kelvin Ogilvie, who represents Nova Scotia, has chaired the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology.
Senator Kelvin Ogilvie, who represents Nova Scotia, has chaired the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology.

WOLFVILLE NS – Nova Scotia Senator Kelvin Ogilvie will give a talk on Feb. 23 about the Senate Committee's report on Dementia – ‘The National Strategy for Dementia Friendly Communities.’

His talk is hosted by Acadia Lifelong Learning and will take place at the Irving Centre auditorium at noon.

The Canadian Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology recently studied the impact dementia has on our society. The committee tabled its report in November.

In 2012, the World Health Organization called dementia a public health priority and called on governments around the world to develop dementia plans and strategies to deal with this global crisis. Currently, 30 countries around the world have national dementia strategies in place, including Malta. 



Of all the current G7 countries, only Germany and Canada don’t have national strategies. Nova Scotia is currently in year two of a provincial dementia strategy.



“The committee considers it imperative that the Canadian government work with provincial counterparts and the Alzheimer Societies across the country,” said Ogilvie, who chaired the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology.

“Canada must move immediately to work with all stakeholders,” he said, “to develop and implement a national strategy to meet this growing health crisis.”

 

Did you know? 


The Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia (ASNS) is a not-for-profit health charity serving Nova Scotians impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Active in communities across the province, the Society offers help for today through programs and services for people living with dementia and hope for tomorrow by funding research to find the cause and the cure.  

For more information visit www.alzheimer.ca/ns.

His talk is hosted by Acadia Lifelong Learning and will take place at the Irving Centre auditorium at noon.

The Canadian Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology recently studied the impact dementia has on our society. The committee tabled its report in November.

In 2012, the World Health Organization called dementia a public health priority and called on governments around the world to develop dementia plans and strategies to deal with this global crisis. Currently, 30 countries around the world have national dementia strategies in place, including Malta. 



Of all the current G7 countries, only Germany and Canada don’t have national strategies. Nova Scotia is currently in year two of a provincial dementia strategy.



“The committee considers it imperative that the Canadian government work with provincial counterparts and the Alzheimer Societies across the country,” said Ogilvie, who chaired the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology.

“Canada must move immediately to work with all stakeholders,” he said, “to develop and implement a national strategy to meet this growing health crisis.”

 

Did you know? 


The Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia (ASNS) is a not-for-profit health charity serving Nova Scotians impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Active in communities across the province, the Society offers help for today through programs and services for people living with dementia and hope for tomorrow by funding research to find the cause and the cure.  

For more information visit www.alzheimer.ca/ns.

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