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Beachcombing fun: Fundy Rocks rocks Scott's Bay


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By Kirk Starratt

kstarratt@kingscountynews.ca

KingsCountyNews.ca

A standing room only crowd filled the Scott’s Bay hall recently to learn more about finding treasures on the beach.

David and Chris Sheppard organized Fundy Rocks, a group of local rock hunters and outdoors enthusiasts. 

The Wolfville father-son pair invited the public to a presentation at the community hall Aug. 17, to be followed by some rock hunting on the beach. Every seat was full and David said they were overwhelmed with the turnout.

Among about 100 people searching for rocks on the beach following the presentation was 10-year-old Shane MacInnis. The first-time rock hunter from New Brunswick was having a great time, breaking rocks open with his pick in the hopes of discovering some spectacular specimens of his own.

“I already got a few in my bucket,” MacInnis said.

Another visitor, Nancy Leslie of British Columbia, said the rocks in Scotts’s Bay were like jewels compared to the beaches near her Victoria home.  Leslie said she went on a hike to Amethyst Cove last summer with her sister and daughter. Just before they left, they found a piece. However, just as important to her as the specimen was the experience and all the stories the family has to tell.

The experience matters to the Sheppards. David  said Chris wanted him to take up hiking as a way for them to spend time together enjoying a healthy, outdoor activity. The older Sheppard wanted to combine the challenge of hiking with another hobby - collecting rock specimens.

“Some of the rocks people wouldn’t believe came from just a couple miles away,” he said of the spectacular examples of amethyst and agates on display.

David said the popularity of rockhounding is good for the community of Scott’s Bay and the surrounding area in terms of tourism. David and Chris say they want people to appreciate the natural wonder of the area, as some of the rocks waiting to be found are “unsurpassed throughout the world” in quality. David said they like to concentrate on the area between Ross Creek around to White Water at the bottom of Cape Blomidon.

“We mainly do this for educational purposes,” David said, pointing out everyone who attended would get to take some small specimens home with them.

“We just want the public to know what’s out here.”

The rock-hunting excursion Aug. 17 was conducted in a safe area on the Scott’s Bay beach. David said rockhounding is something you do at your own risk and to your own ability. For example, one place they like to visit, Amethyst Cove, has a steep 500-foot cliff. One caution – David pointed out they don’t recommend scaling rock slides, as this can be very dangerous if not fatal.

Chris agreed rockhounding can be a healthy, family activity that all ages and abilities can enjoy. He also enjoys photographing the colourful amethyst and agate specimens collected on more than 300 hikes in the Cape Blomidon and Cape Split peninsula areas.

“The natural beauty is what I like,” Chris said. “That’s what got me into photography.”

When he first started rockhounding, Chris said he was looking for research and other information online, but couldn’t find much. That’s why he decided to start his own blog.

View an exhibit of Chris’ photography beginning Kentville’s CentreStage Theatre.

For more information on Fundy Rocks, contact fundyrocksgroup@gmail.com, 542-3390 or on Facebook.

By Kirk Starratt

kstarratt@kingscountynews.ca

KingsCountyNews.ca

A standing room only crowd filled the Scott’s Bay hall recently to learn more about finding treasures on the beach.

David and Chris Sheppard organized Fundy Rocks, a group of local rock hunters and outdoors enthusiasts. 

The Wolfville father-son pair invited the public to a presentation at the community hall Aug. 17, to be followed by some rock hunting on the beach. Every seat was full and David said they were overwhelmed with the turnout.

Among about 100 people searching for rocks on the beach following the presentation was 10-year-old Shane MacInnis. The first-time rock hunter from New Brunswick was having a great time, breaking rocks open with his pick in the hopes of discovering some spectacular specimens of his own.

“I already got a few in my bucket,” MacInnis said.

Another visitor, Nancy Leslie of British Columbia, said the rocks in Scotts’s Bay were like jewels compared to the beaches near her Victoria home.  Leslie said she went on a hike to Amethyst Cove last summer with her sister and daughter. Just before they left, they found a piece. However, just as important to her as the specimen was the experience and all the stories the family has to tell.

The experience matters to the Sheppards. David  said Chris wanted him to take up hiking as a way for them to spend time together enjoying a healthy, outdoor activity. The older Sheppard wanted to combine the challenge of hiking with another hobby - collecting rock specimens.

“Some of the rocks people wouldn’t believe came from just a couple miles away,” he said of the spectacular examples of amethyst and agates on display.

David said the popularity of rockhounding is good for the community of Scott’s Bay and the surrounding area in terms of tourism. David and Chris say they want people to appreciate the natural wonder of the area, as some of the rocks waiting to be found are “unsurpassed throughout the world” in quality. David said they like to concentrate on the area between Ross Creek around to White Water at the bottom of Cape Blomidon.

“We mainly do this for educational purposes,” David said, pointing out everyone who attended would get to take some small specimens home with them.

“We just want the public to know what’s out here.”

The rock-hunting excursion Aug. 17 was conducted in a safe area on the Scott’s Bay beach. David said rockhounding is something you do at your own risk and to your own ability. For example, one place they like to visit, Amethyst Cove, has a steep 500-foot cliff. One caution – David pointed out they don’t recommend scaling rock slides, as this can be very dangerous if not fatal.

Chris agreed rockhounding can be a healthy, family activity that all ages and abilities can enjoy. He also enjoys photographing the colourful amethyst and agate specimens collected on more than 300 hikes in the Cape Blomidon and Cape Split peninsula areas.

“The natural beauty is what I like,” Chris said. “That’s what got me into photography.”

When he first started rockhounding, Chris said he was looking for research and other information online, but couldn’t find much. That’s why he decided to start his own blog.

View an exhibit of Chris’ photography beginning Kentville’s CentreStage Theatre.

For more information on Fundy Rocks, contact fundyrocksgroup@gmail.com, 542-3390 or on Facebook.

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